A collaboration between Andre Woolery and Victor Abijaoudi

A collaboration between Andre Woolery and Victor Abijaoudi

"As the world becomes more digital, we pull further away from an analog, handcrafted world. However, the one remaining human component of the digital experience is TOUCH."

ARTIST STATEMENT

The mobile device has become our primary communication tool and it will increasingly become the remote control for the digital world. If you look at your device’s screens, the fingerprints left behind illustrate how intimate we are becoming with the device itself.  The objects that receive our human touch are powerful indicators of where we place our compassion and love. The smudges left on our screens provide insight into what the future will look like and a story of our ongoing existence.

With the Invisible Hieroglyphics artwork we lifted fingerprints from the screens of iPads and creatively recast them with colors, giving testimony of our human touch. The traces left from our fingerprints on the screens of our devices are rich with story.  The Invisible Hieroglyphics project illuminates that as the world becomes more digital we will rely on devices for human connection, rather than physical means. Capturing the fingerprints made us a shift back and forth between analog and digital. Most importantly it displayed how we are communicating as a mobile society.

hot off the press ih.011.jpg

The project also challenges our conceptions of the boundaries of art and its mediums.  At first glance, they appear as simple finger smudges, but these traces are not trivial. We are constantly participating in the creation of art, and art is participating in the discovery of who we are. The artwork shows that our devices are simple canvases and what we do with them is the art society continues to create unknowingly.  The message is invisible yet remains a hieroglyphic of the direction we are headed.

In the end, these hieroglyphics are a system of writing that serves as a form of communication. If you strip away the hardware and software, what’s left is a finger painting that communicates progress while posing a question for the future: What are the future consequences of human touch only occurring with a device and not another human?


THE TITLE..."INVISIBLE HIEROGLYPHICS"

Hieroglyphics is a system of writing that serves as a form of communication. They represent an imprint of the world as it was told in the past for the future to decipher and understand. These writings are a window into another world. Today, the touchscreen interface is our window into another world and the writings are smudged onto the screen instead of carved into stone. Its subtle, but if you strip away the hardware and software, what’s left is a finger painting that illustrates the story of how we communicate.

THE APPS

We collected a series of apps ranging from daily productivity to social networking and gaming. What we uncovered is a really interesting set of blueprints for interaction. Shout out to all the user experience designers that worked on all these apps…this artwork is as much ours as it is a showcase of their intuitive pathways.  The artwork highlights the "blueprints" crafted in the user experience designers of each app that we used.

THE PROCESS

The process was filled with experimentation. We had a concept that we wanted to explore with no notion of what the finished work would like.  After a series of trail and error, we developed a process to create the artwork we uncovered:

Capture the fingerprints with a camera.

Capture the fingerprints with a camera.

Place the image into Photoshop to manipulate.

Place the image into Photoshop to manipulate.

Apply layers of color based on finger pressure.

Apply layers of color based on finger pressure.

DIGITAL TO PHYSICAL

The images on artwork offer no justice to its physical presence. The colors are vibrantly portrayed on satin paper that is placed between a white backing and 1/4” acrylic glass. The acrylic glass gives this piece incredible luminosity and optical depth that mimics an actual screen.  We wanted to finished work to feel like the screen that it was lifted from. This is the very first print that was executed correctly after several rounds of figuring out the best way to make this come to life.


THE ARTWORK

Each piece has three versions; Black and White, Color on Black, and Polychrome: